MADISON – Democratic Party of Wisconsin Chair Joe Wineke today joined President-elect Barack Obama in recognizing the need to have an economic recovery plan completed and passed by Congress in time for the President-elect to sign when he is sworn in to office next month.

“At a time when American jobs are being cut, wages are falling, and our citizens are worried about keeping their homes, we need to put partisanship aside and pass a comprehensive economic recovery plan,” said Wineke. “There are no quick or easy fixes to this crisis, but we have an opportunity today to seize this moment to transform our economy, create at least 2.5 million more jobs over the next two years, invest in America’s economic future, and strengthen the middle class for years to come.”

“We need to have a plan completed and passed by Congress in time for President-elect Obama to sign when he is sworn in,” said Wineke.

Last month, the American people elected President-elect Obama and the Democratic Congress to put our economy back to work for ordinary Americans by investing in health care, education, and jobs. 

Wineke applauded Congressional Democrats for working on an economic recovery plan that will do this by improving transportation, modernizing schools, promoting energy independence, creating good jobs, and increasing federal aid to states and local communities to fund critical law enforcement, education and health care services.

He applauded efforts to complete a recovery plan for President-elect Obama to sign when he takes office in January and called on Wisconsin Republicans to join Democrats in passing a recovery plan.

Since December 2007, more than 2 million American jobs have been lost nationally and a housing crisis has threatened the economic security of countless more working families. Major industries are beginning to fail, and businesses can’t find the credit to create new jobs. Just last week, reports showed that the number of Americans filing unemployment insurance claims rose to the highest level in nearly 30 years. The American economy is already in the second longest recession since the end of the World War II, a crisis that is expected to grow worse.